Monthly Archives: September 2012

The Wisconsin Idea in Action

One of the factors which attracted me to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for graduate school was the Wisconsin Idea—the belief that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state. (Yes, that is much more important than … Continue reading

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Sticker Shock in Choosing Colleges: What Can Be Done?

Very few items are priced in the same manner as a college education. While the price of some items, such as cars and houses, can be negotiated downward from a posted (sticker) price, the actual price and the sticker price … Continue reading

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Public Research at its Finest: The 2012 Ig Nobel Prize Winners

It is no secret that academics research some obscure topics—and are known to write about these topics in ways that obfuscate the importance of such research. This is one reason why former Senator William Proxmire (D-WI) started the Golden Fleece … Continue reading

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Knowing Before You Go

Knowing Before You Go The American Enterprise Institute today hosted a discussion of the Student Right to Know Before You Go Act, introduced by Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) and co-sponsored by Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL). The two senators, both of … Continue reading

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The Limitations of “Data-Driven” Decisions

It’s safe to say that I am a data-driven person. I am an economist of education by training, and I get more than a little giddy when I get a new dataset that can help me examine an interesting policy … Continue reading

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To Be a “Best Value,” Charge Higher Tuition

In addition to the better-known college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the magazine also publishes a listing of “Best Value” colleges. The listing seems helpful enough, with the goal of highlighting colleges which are a good value for … Continue reading

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Explaining Subgroup Effects: The New York City Voucher Experiment

The last three-plus years of my professional life have been consumed by attempting to determine the extent to which a privately funded need-based grant program affected the outcomes of college students from low-income families in the state of Wisconsin. Although … Continue reading

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Measuring Prestige: Analyzing the U.S. News & World Report College Rankings

The 2013 U.S. News college rankings were released today and are certain to be the topic of discussion for much of the higher education community. Many people grumble about the rankings, but it’s hard to dismiss the rankings due to … Continue reading

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How (Not) to Rank Colleges

The college rankings marketplace became a little bit more crowded this week with the release of a partial set of rankings from an outfit called The Alumni Factor. The rankings, headed by Monica McGurk, former partner at McKinsey & Company, … Continue reading

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