Monthly Archives: November 2012

Am I On the Wrong Job Market?

In light of being on the academic job market this year, I was amused to get the following mailing from the local branch of Globe University. (Even though the mailing was addressed to me, it was also addressed to “Or … Continue reading

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Not Every College is Elite

Like many happenings in American society, the perception of the college selection process is driven by the most elite people and institutions. There are plenty of stories out there about how students apply to more than ten colleges, yet are … Continue reading

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More Fun With College Rankings

I was recently interviewed by Koran Addo of the (Baton Rouge) Advocate regarding my work with the Washington Monthly college rankings. I’ve had quite a few phone and e-mail exchanges with college officials and the media about my work, but … Continue reading

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The Big N Conference and Athletic Realignment

Mentioning the name “Big Ten” evokes certain sentiments in the minds of many Americans. Although the conference is much more than just smashmouth, low-scoring football games played on chilly November days under gunmetal skies in places as exotic as Iowa … Continue reading

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Paying It Forward: A Different Take on Income-Based Repayment

In prior blog posts, I have been less than charitable toward the federal government’s changes to the income-based repayment policies for student loans. (As a reminder, these changes provide large subsidies to students who attend expensive colleges and particularly those … Continue reading

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Am I Selling “Mathematical Nonsense?”

When I started a line of research on college rankings and value-added, I assumed that if my work ever saw the light of day, it would be at least somewhat controversial. I’ve gotten plenty of feedback on my academic research … Continue reading

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Pell Grants and Data-Driven Decisions

I am a big proponent of making data-driven decisions whenever possible, but sadly that isn’t the case among many policymakers. Recently, in an effort to reduce costs, Congress and the Obama Administration agreed to reduce the maximum number of semesters … Continue reading

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College Selectivity Does Not Imply Quality

For me, the greatest benefit of attending academic conferences is the ability to clarify my own thinking about important issues in educational policy. At my most recent conference last week, I attended several outstanding sessions on issues in higher education … Continue reading

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A November Surprise in Student Loans

A few weeks ago, I co-authored a piece in The Chronicle of Higher Education on the federal government’s authority to relax income-based repayment requirements for student loans. To summarize the proposal, the federal government was granted the authority (starting in … Continue reading

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