Monthly Archives: January 2013

More Proposed Financial Aid Reforms

The past few months have been an exciting time for financial aid researchers, as many reports proposing changes in federal financial aid policies and practices have been released as a part of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Reimagining Aid … Continue reading

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An Incomplete Comparison of College Costs and Expenditures

A recent piece by Derek Thompson of The Atlantic shows a provocative chart that suggests that students from the lowest-income families pay much more out-of-pocket to attend college than that college actually spends on their education: (From The Atlantic) This … Continue reading

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Another Commission on Improving Graduation Rates

College leaders and policymakers are rightly concerned about the percentage of incoming students who graduate in a reasonable period of time. Although there have been numerous reports and commissions at the university, state, and national level to improve college completion … Continue reading

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Back in the Classroom Again

A lot of things have happened since the spring of 2008—I’ve earned a master’s degree in economics and nearly completed a PhD in education policy, have spent thousands of hours staring at the black and then white backgrounds of Stata, … Continue reading

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Predicting Student Loan Default Rates

Regular readers of this blog know that there are several concerns to using outcome measures in a higher education accountability system. One of my primary concerns is that outcomes must be adjusted to reflect a college’s inputs—in non-economist language, this … Continue reading

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Is Money from Parents Bad for Students?

Most people would generally consider a student getting money from his or her parents while in college to be a good thing—after all, most traditional-age college students tend to have few resources of their own and additional money from Mom … Continue reading

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Wisconsin Higher Education Policy Issues for 2013

2013 marks a potential benchmark year for state higher education policy debates. More tends to happen in odd-numbered years because politicians are farther away from elections and more willing to make difficult budget decisions—and the influx of federal stimulus dollars … Continue reading

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Transparency and Teacher Education Programs

I am a firm believer in the public’s right to know nearly everything about government-funded institutions unless there is a clear and compelling reason for privacy. For that reason, I have been following the University of Wisconsin System’s fight against … Continue reading

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Examining Kiplinger’s Best Value Colleges

Not too many articles on higher education feature my alma mater, Truman State University. In spite of a long tradition of internal accountability and doing a good job of graduating students on a shoestring budget, Truman lacks the name recognition … Continue reading

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