Tag Archives: methodology

Not-so-Free College and the Disappointment Effect

One of the most appealing aspects of tuition-free higher education proposals is that they convey a simple message about higher education affordability. Although students will need to come up with a substantial amount of money to cover textbooks, fees, and … Continue reading

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Understanding Financial Responsibility Scores for Private Colleges

This post originally appeared on the Brookings Institution’s Brown Center Chalkboard blog. The stories of financially struggling private colleges, both nonprofit and for-profit, have been told in many news articles. Small private nonprofit colleges are increasing tuition discount rates in … Continue reading

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Comments on the New College Scorecard Data

The Obama Administration’s two-year effort to develop a federal college ratings system appeared to have hit a dead-end in June, with the announcement that no ratings would actually be released before the start of the 2015-2016 academic year. At that … Continue reading

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Comments on the Brookings Value-Added Rankings

Jonathan Rothwell and Siddharth Kulkarni of the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings made a big splash today with the release of a set of college “value-added” rankings (link to full study and Inside Higher Ed summary) focused primarily on labor … Continue reading

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How to Calculate–and Not Calculate–Net Prices

Colleges’ net prices, which the U.S. Department of Education defines as the total cost of attendance (tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and other living expenses) less all grant and scholarship aid, have received a lot of … Continue reading

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Do Student Loans Result in Tuition Increases? Why It’s So Hard to Tell

One of the longstanding questions in higher education finance is whether access to federal financial aid dollars is one of the factors behind tuition increases. This was famously stated by Education Secretary William Bennett in a 1987 New York Times … Continue reading

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Should College Admissions be Randomized?

Sixty-nine percent of students who apply to Stanford University with perfect SAT scores are rejected. Let that sink in for a minute…getting a perfect SAT is far from easy. In 2013, the College Board reported that only 494 students out … Continue reading

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Comparing the US News and Washington Monthly Rankings

In yesterday’s post, I discussed the newly released 2014 college rankings from U.S. News & World Report and how they changed from last year. In spite of some changes in methodology that were billed as “significant,” the R-squared value when … Continue reading

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College Reputation Rankings Go Global

College rankings are not a phenomenon which is limited to the United States. Shanghai Jiao Tong University has ranked research universities for the past decade, and the well-known Times Higher Education rankings have been around for several years. While the … Continue reading

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Another Random List of “Best Value” Colleges

Getting a good value for attending college is on the mind of most prospective students and their families, and as a result, numerous publishers of college rankings have come out with lists of “best value” colleges. I have highlighted the … Continue reading

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